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My child doesn’t sleep at all
(father of 3 year old.)

      I watched as Roger slept peacefully in his car seat. And, then his father grabbed him out of the car and quickly moved him towards the next location. Roger let out a protective squeal. Pushing against his father’s body. He was frantic, worried and so very tired. (There was an immediate disconnect between sleep, waking time, intentions and individual needs).

I watched as Roger slept peacefully in his car seat. And, then his father grabbed him out of the car and quickly moved him towards the next location. Roger let out a protective squeal. Pushing against his father’s body. He was frantic, worried and so very tired. (There was an immediate disconnect between sleep, waking time, intentions and individual needs).

       Roger had been having trouble falling asleep at night, staying asleep in the early morning hours and controlling his temper during the day.

      We identified the language, sensory, and emotional needs of the child and father. We used a simple movement sensory check to support options of how to help Roger soothe himself to comfortably fall asleep. We identified how to support Rogers ability to anticipate changes and have a clear beginning, middle and end of interactions. For instance, his father would tell him goodnight before he fell asleep rather than having him unaware that his dad tip toed away. Or he would know when he may be woken suddenly vs. having indulgent sleep time.

   We practiced options for soothing: identifying if Roger responded best to gross motor movements, sounds, visual stimulation, or touch. By exploring his preferences he was given a sensory diet that could help him anticipate and receive support towards sleep.

   Emotionally his father helped him explore the comfort of his room. He used words to acknowledge him as the expert sleeper and to validate that he was safe and secure for the night. Together they worked on awareness for sitting in the unknown and being ok. Utilizing the senses to be present in his body.  

   There are many strategies for supporting the schedule and timing of sleep. Once we trust that our children will sleep, we are receptive to the optimal outcome. When we look at the body for strategies, sleep becomes a place of movement and a release of control. 

Opportunities like this make me truly inspired and grateful. Putting my practice in action to create positive change fuels the passion for my work. Thank you for sharing this Moving Moment with me!

Sign up for your free consultation time to recieve individualized support for your family or share this with a friend or colleague. Check out Drloribaudino.com for more programs and supportive ways to connect with children!

Please Note: These stories are based on real moments but all names, ages, and identifying information has been changed to ensure confidentiality and safety for all individuals involved. The events are a composite of related scenarios used to illustrate the work; bringing understanding to the benefits of supporting children through a mind/body connection.

Special Thanks to The Andrea Rizzo Foundation. Dreasdream.org

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